65 Madison Ave · Suite 420 · Morristown, NJ · 07960

¡Attention TAC People!

Press 'p' on your keyboard to make this palette go away.

Max width: 1200px
Color Hex R G B
Blue from Logo#003d65 0 61 101
Darker Blue#021020 2 16 32
Red from Logo#780500 120 5 0
Darker Red#400000 64 0 0
Gray from Modern Firm Site#f3f2ed 243 242 237
Bright, Light Blue#ccebff 204 235 255
Form Input Background Blue#accfe6 172 207 230
Slightly Darker Blue#002e4d 0 46 77
Slightly Darker Gray#e6e5e0 0 46 77
Darker Gray#cccbc7 0 46 77
Lighter Logo Blue#005c99 204 235 255
Login Link Blue#598fb3 89 143 179
Slighty Lighter Red#99150f 153 21 15
Slighty Darker Gray#b3b2ae 179 178 174
Hunter Green#013b23 1 59 35
Lighter Green #025935 ? ? ?
Beige Charcoal #1f1e1e ? ? ?
"Metallic Gold" #D4AF37 ? ? ?
"Darker Green" #012e1b ? ? ?

Indigent Mother Fights To Retain Parental Rights

On Dec. 21, the state Supreme Court in New Jersey announced that it will hear a case in April 2016 concerning a woman whose child was placed with a foster family and kept there due to the woman’s poverty. The child has special needs, and in 2012, the woman took her daughter to the Children’s Home Society of New Jersey. She had intended for the child to have short-term foster care after several years of living with relatives and in homeless shelters.

Because the woman did not visit the child regularly, after a year, the Children’s Home Society suggested that the foster family move to terminate parental rights. Although the woman was not found unfit to care for the child in any way, a judge still terminated those rights. An attorney began pro bono representation of the mother partway through her appeal, and in October, she was granted visitation rights. The court also said that all parents in a similar situation had a right to legal representation.

However, the state Supreme Court has now suspended those visitation rights and said a judge should determine the psychological effect on the child of having her mother visit after such a long time. The court’s decision in April will probably set the law going forward.

Family law and custody cases can be complex, and this case might have repercussions for couples who are divorcing as well. While courts usually make an effort to keep children with their biological parents, if this court rules that a parent can lose their parental rights even without accusations of abuse or neglect, it might be an indication that this will be less of a priority. Parents who are concerned about keeping access to their children during a separation or divorce may wish to speak to an attorney.

Begin Your Conversation

  • Disclaimer: Contacting our firm via the internet does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please do not send any confidential information through this form.

Contact Our Morris County Office

866-957-2982

973-828-0829

Morristown / Morris County Law Office

65 Madison Ave

Suite 420

Morristown, NJ 07960

Morris County Mediation Office Map