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What Do I Need to Know About Alimony in New Jersey?

A divorce separates two spouses’ lives from one another. However, a clean break may not be possible for all couples. Sometimes, a household may only have one income. These situations can leave one spouse in an unfair situation without an income of their own if they go through a divorce. It is because of this that one spouse may be required to pay court-ordered financial support to their former spouse after the divorce is final. This is known as alimony. If you wish to fight for alimony in your divorce, retain the services of an experienced New Jersey divorce attorney for assistance. 

Types of Alimony

In New Jersey, there are four different types of alimony. These are as follows:

  • Open Durational Alimony: Couples who were married or in a civil union for more than 20 years may be required to pay this alimony. Under this court-order, there is no end date to the payments until there is a reason to terminate. Termination may occur in the event of cohabitation, remarriage, if the spouse paying becomes disabled or unemployed, or if the dependent spouse becomes independent.
  • Limited Duration Alimony: Couples who were married or in a civil union for less than 20 years may be required to pay this alimony. These payments should be made no longer than the length of the marriage/union. Termination may also be allowed in the event of a change in either former spouse’s situations.
  • Rehabilitative Alimony: If the dependent spouse put off their career in order to support their partner and family, this may be owed to them so that they can pursue schooling or training.
  • Reimbursement Alimony: This reimburses a former spouse if they financially supported their partner’s own education or training.

What Should I Provide my Attorney if I Want Alimony?

If you wish to receive alimony, it is important to speak with your attorney to determine if you are eligible. If your attorney advises that you are a candidate for alimony, it can benefit you to provide the following information to the attorney:

  • A history of the interruptions in your education or career to benefit your spouse
  • A history of the interruptions in your education or career to raise children
  • Your full educational background
  • Your work history, including the names of employers, dates of employment, duties, pay, and why you left
  • Any pensions or other benefits lost due to the interruption of your career to benefit the marriage
  • Your health history
  • Your monthly living expenses as well as anticipated future expenses
  • A list of the debts for you and your spouse
  • The income for you and your spouse

Contact our Firm

If you need an experienced legal team to guide you through your divorce, contact Townsend, Tomaio & Newmark L.L.C today.